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- See more at: http://www.fitchburgchamber.com/city-of-fitchburg-refuse-tags-now-available-at-fitchburg-hometown-pharmacy/

 

 

City of Fitchburg Refuse Tags – Now available at Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy

Pharmacy located in Hatchery Hill Towne Center offers personalized, quick, and convenient pharmacy services.

Fitchburg, WI, July 18, 2013: Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy is proud to partner with the City of Fitchburg to sell refuse tags to Fitchburg residents. The tags are available in sheets of 5 for $17. They are available for sale Monday-Friday 9-6 and Saturday 9-1.

The City of Fitchburg Refuse Tag program, allows households to purchase tags for disposal of additional refuse that does not fit into their refuse cart. Each tag allows you to set out one extra 32 gallon bag of refuse. If you use a tag to set out an extra bag of refuse, wrap the tag around the top of the bag so that it affixes to itself.

Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy is located in Hatchery Hill Towne Center between the Hallmark and GNC Stores. If you have questions call the pharmacy at 608-274-3784.

- See more at: http://www.fitchburgchamber.com/city-of-fitchburg-refuse-tags-now-available-at-fitchburg-hometown-pharmacy/#sthash.ASbMp32M.dpuf

City of Fitchburg Refuse Tags – Now available at Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy

Pharmacy located in Hatchery Hill Towne Center offers personalized, quick, and convenient pharmacy services.

Fitchburg, WI, July 18, 2013: Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy is proud to partner with the City of Fitchburg to sell refuse tags to Fitchburg residents. The tags are available in sheets of 5 for $17. They are available for sale Monday-Friday 9-6 and Saturday 9-1.

The City of Fitchburg Refuse Tag program, allows households to purchase tags for disposal of additional refuse that does not fit into their refuse cart. Each tag allows you to set out one extra 32 gallon bag of refuse. If you use a tag to set out an extra bag of refuse, wrap the tag around the top of the bag so that it affixes to itself.

Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy is located in Hatchery Hill Towne Center between the Hallmark and GNC Stores. If you have questions call the pharmacy at 608-274-3784.

- See more at: http://www.fitchburgchamber.com/city-of-fitchburg-refuse-tags-now-available-at-fitchburg-hometown-pharmacy/#sthash.ASbMp32M.dpuf

City of Fitchburg Refuse Tags – Now available at Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy

Pharmacy located in Hatchery Hill Towne Center offers personalized, quick, and convenient pharmacy services.

Fitchburg, WI, July 18, 2013: Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy is proud to partner with the City of Fitchburg to sell refuse tags to Fitchburg residents. The tags are available in sheets of 5 for $17. They are available for sale Monday-Friday 9-6 and Saturday 9-1.

The City of Fitchburg Refuse Tag program, allows households to purchase tags for disposal of additional refuse that does not fit into their refuse cart. Each tag allows you to set out one extra 32 gallon bag of refuse. If you use a tag to set out an extra bag of refuse, wrap the tag around the top of the bag so that it affixes to itself.

Fitchburg Hometown Pharmacy is located in Hatchery Hill Towne Center between the Hallmark and GNC Stores. If you have questions call the pharmacy at 608-274-3784.

- See more at: http://www.fitchburgchamber.com/city-of-fitchburg-refuse-tags-now-available-at-fitchburg-hometown-pharmacy/#sthash.ASbMp32M.dpuf

4/24/2013

Hometown Pharmacy Caring for Hometown Families

By: Tierney King

At seven months old, little Breck Buenger has become the face of the Hometown Pharmacy advertisements, 13 N. Bird St., and has become the center of conversation to customers as they walk in and see the little guy in mother, Shawna or dad, Jason Buenger’s arms.

The impact of family has been pivotal in the pharmacy’s fun-loving atmosphere and mirrors their slogan of “Our family caring for your family.”

“It’s kind of neat for people to see we’re a family at the store as well,” Shawna said.

This opportunity arose when pharmacist Jason Buenger was offered his own Hometown Pharmacy, and he immediately jumped on the bandwagon.

“I’ve worked in the Oregon location for 10 years and they said, “You’ve always wanted to be an owner, would you like to do it?” I said, “Absolutely!” Jason recalled.

Three months ago they started the pharmacy to give people an option beyond the “big box” stores. Jason said that many people think that a local pharmacy will not honor insurances or co-pays, but he said a co-pay is a co-pay no matter where a person goes.

“I think people think we’re small and independent and can’t handle their problems.” Jason said “All pharmacies order the same way. Any pharmacy has access to all medications.”

Contrary to other pharmacies is Hometown’s compounding services.

Jason is able to manipulate medications that are not commercially available to people.

“We make stuff for animals, pediatrics, special needs children, and more. So if a person is allergic to a commercial product because it has a dye they can’t take, I make it without the dye in it.” Jason said. “If they can’t take tablets, we make it into liquid form.”

With a lab right in the pharmacy, Jason is able to create the new formula right on location effectively and efficiently. He said normally people get it done out-of-state, but now, people have a local option. Another advantage with this method is that his turnover rate is a lot faster, he said.

“Typically I try to run things in about 24 to 36 hours, whereas most people say it’ll be about a week,” Jason said. “So we make things a lot quicker and if patients or clinics have questions, they can talk straight to me and I can fix it right away.”

Talking to clients and customers is exactly what the Buenger’s crave.

“Our customer service is treating people like a person,” Jason said. “We really take pride in our store to know the person when they walk through the door.”

He said when they help out individuals with financial problems, insurance questions, or custom made medications; they end up having those customers as long-term returners. They also cater to customers needs by offering curbside pick-up and delivery. Since their location does not offer a drive-thru, Jason tries to accommodate for this by offering these methods.

 “If people call me, I’ll walk right outside and deliver it to them,” he said. “I have often brought medication to people after we’ve closed. I also have after-hours emergency hours so people can call me, and it’s actually my cell phone. I encourage people to use it since being open 24 hours a day just isn’t all that feasible.”

Many people have appreciated Hometown Pharmacy’s extra efforts. Jason said a surprise to the general public was their refill efficiency.

“People will ask if I can fill a prescription for them and how long it will be. I’ll tell them about five minutes and they’ll gasp. I’ll ask, is that too long? They’ll tell me that other places tell them it’ll be sixty minutes.”

Jason said at the Oregon location, people would send them bouquets of flowers or plates of cookies during the Christmas season just appreciating their services.

“It makes you feel good and makes you feel like your making an impact on somebody else,” Jason said. “It’s kind of like making your own mark in this life.”

The Hometown Pharmacy is not just limited to their custom-made or normal medication orders, but also offers a variety of products in their store.

Shawna said that Jason’s 10 year-old daughter and 8 year-old son helped pick out some of the products they wanted to include in the store. The kids chose candles on a string that hang in an aesthetically appealing way. Then when a homeowner wants to use one of the candles, they simply cut a candle off the string and place the candle wherever utilization calls for.

 The Buenger’s seven-month old son also had an impact on their natural products. Breck had been breaking out on his neck and face from fragrances and chemicals that were in lotions, cleaning supplies, candles, air fresheners, and more. Shawna decided that she would offer natural-made products. A pharmacist specially handcrafted one line of product they chose. Their emphasis on family health and care is apparent in each aisle.

“We also don’t sell cigarettes,” Jason said. “It seems contradictory to have in a pharmacy”

The Buengers hold to it that they stay true to their slogan and all three are at the store on a consistent basis.

“We don’t keep Breck away,” Shawna said. “We, as a family, are going to be the ones to take care of your family.”

1/17/13:
Hometown Pharmacy Opens Pharmacy Store Location in Oshkosh
New pharmacy at 321 North Sawyer St. offers personalized, quick, convenient service

OSHKOSH, Wis., January 17, 2013 — Hometown Pharmacy has opened a new pharmacy location at 321 North Sawyer St. in Oshkosh, Wis.

The new pharmacy location, which officially opened on January 14, 2013, offers Oshkosh and Fox Cities residents a personalized approach to pharmacy care, at a comparable price to other pharmacy outlets and drug stores, in a convenient location. This enables Oshkosh and Fox Cities residents to rely on a trustworthy, local healthcare partner, while avoiding the wait and frustration associated with many large retailers or chain store pharmacy outlets.

Hometown Pharmacy accepts all insurance plans and offers easy prescription transfers. New clients simply need to gather their current medications, then call or visit a Hometown Pharmacy location and the Pharmacist will take care of the transfer. Home delivery is also available.

The new location also offers a variety of other services besides prescriptions, including flu shots and other vaccinations, blood pressure measurements, Medicare Part D consultations, medication management evaluations, pet prescriptions and compounded medications. A gift department will be coming soon.

The Oshkosh Hometown Pharmacy is approximately 1,500 sq. ft. and is its convenient location allows for easy access and ample parking for customers.

Pharmacy store hours are Monday through Friday, 9am to 6pm, and Saturdays 9am to 1pm. The store can be reached by phone at 920-426-0763 or by fax at 920-426-0784. Jess Mangold, RPh, is the Managing Pharmacist. Mangold’s 12 years of experience includes working as an Informatics Pharmacist with the National Naval Medical Center, as a Nuclear Pharmacist with Cardinal Health, and as a Long Term Care Pharmacist with ShopKo RxCare and Omnicare.

 

12/6/12:
Hometown Pharmacy Opens Pharmacy Store Location in Neenah
New pharmacy at 1415 South Commercial St. offers personalized, quick, convenient service

NEENAH, Wis., December 6, 2012 — Hometown Pharmacy has opened a new pharmacy location at 1415 South Commercial St. in Neenah, Wis.

The new pharmacy location, which officially opened on December 5, 2012, offers Neenah and Fox Cities residents a personalized approach to pharmacy care, at a comparable price to other pharmacy outlets and drug stores, in a convenient location. This enables Neenah and Fox Cities residents to rely on a trustworthy, local healthcare partner.

The new location offers a variety of services, including prescriptions, home delivery, flu shots and other vaccinations, blood pressure measurements, Medicare Part D consultations, medication management evaluations, pet prescriptions and compounded medications.

Pharmacy store hours are Monday through Friday, 8am to 6pm, and Saturdays 9am to 1pm. The store can be reached by phone at 920-729-4910 or by fax at 920-729-4879. Jeff Cushman, RPh, who has been serving the Fox Valley area for more than 24 years, is the lead pharmacist and partner.

 

11/11/12: Wisconsin State Journal – On Wisconsin: Small towns gear up for holiday season

EVANSVILLE — Shelley Meredith was a little hurried when I met up with her last week at the business she manages in this city’s quaint downtown.

Christmas can do that to a retailer.

Meredith doesn’t sell flat-screen televisions, peddle iPhones or have aisles of board games and toys.

But that doesn’t mean this time of the year is laid back or not important to the bottom line. The Hometown Pharmacy she manages is a gift shop, a place to buy cards, home décor items and holiday decorations for all seasons.

Located in the Grange Store building, constructed in 1903, there’s also a small women’s fashion department and, of course, it’s a place to fill a prescription.

“This is where you find niche, in your small town,” Meredith said. “You really have to understand your community.”

Stores here and in most other downtowns in the state won’t be open at midnight for Black Friday — the day after Thanksgiving — nor will shoppers set up lines of tents in order to grab a deep discount on a laptop computer.

Instead, it’s more about community and finding ways to draw customers to the downtown. Once there, they can be introduced to shopping and dining opportunities and hopefully return at other times of the year.

That’s why Evansville is kicking off the holiday shopping season a little earlier than most with its Old Fashioned Christmas.

The setting is ideal. The downtown features a brick-paved Main Street and historic buildings that will be trimmed for the season. The district features shops, restaurants, a coffee shop and is the home of artisans. Events on Friday include free horse-drawn carriage rides; a Main Street Stroll, where visitors can vote on the best decorated store fronts; and a bon fire. On Saturday, Santa Claus arrives downtown on a fire truck.

“That type of unique experience is what brings people downtown,” said Mary Rajek, executive director of the Evansville Area Chamber of Commerce. “We’re really an experience location.”

Running a successful downtown business might be one of the toughest tasks in retailing. The location, however, can offer amenities that are tough to replicate at a shopping mall or a big-box retailer.

Mineral Point, one of the state’s oldest communities, may do one of the best jobs of creating a Norman Rockwell-type experience. On Dec. 1, hundreds of luminaria, roasted chestnuts, carolers and fresh evergreens hanging from lamp posts and facades set the stage for the annual Candlelit Gallery Night and Shopping.

In Sauk City, there will be fireworks, a tree lighting and a parade this Friday, while on Saturday, a parade will wrap around the square in Baraboo and conclude with a tree lighting. The downtown Baraboo businesses will also have their own version of Black Friday with 20 local businesses taking part in special sales from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Nov. 23.

In my hometown of Watertown, the Krier’s Store for Men, Kern’s Men’s Store, Fischer’s Department Store, Kline’s and Kresge’s have all disappeared. Keck Furniture and Brown’s Shoe Fit Co. remain, and Generation Jewelers, founded in 1907, has added wine. Most of what I remember from 30 years ago is gone. The historic, cream-colored brick buildings are now filled with new niche retailers and restaurants.

On Nov. 24, the Watertown Chamber of Commerce will hold “Small Business Saturday,” an event designed to draw shoppers to the downtown. The day concludes with the Holiday of Lights parade. More than 2,000 people could attend.

“The streets are full. It really is a nice event,” said Susan Dascenzo, executive director of the Watertown Chamber. “I think we have a nice diverse downtown. Could they be doing better, yes, but I think they’re hanging in there.”

The downtown events aren’t reserved for small and medium-sized communities. The Madison Central Business improvement District will hold its fifth annual Downtown Holiday Open House this month. The event, highlighting shopping, dining and entertainment destinations, has been expanded to two days and begins Friday on State Street and the Capitol Square.

In Evansville, this is the ninth year of kicking off the holidays prior to Thanksgiving and Rajek is seeing signs for optimism for the downtown’s economic health.

“It’s getting better,” Rajek said. “It’s been wheezing with the recession, but it’s been a good growth year.”

One of the newest additions to the downtown is the Artful Gourmet. The shop opened in August, seven weeks after owners Sue and Duane Nettum stumbled across a vacant but clean space in an 1860s building.

The 900-square-foot store features kitchen gadgets, spices, pasta and sauces and is fashioned after something you might find in Galena, Ill., or on Monroe Street in Madison. Sue Nettum said they rushed their opening in August to take advantage of the city-wide garage sale event and they’re hoping the upcoming Old Fashioned Christmas will also create business.

“A few more shoppers would be really nice,” she said.

And that’s what it’s all about.