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18 Sep

Adolescents and Tattooing

The American Academy of Pediatrics issues new guidelines on Adolescents and Tattoos

15 Sep

Adolescents and Opioids

The number of children addicted to opioids is on the rise, according to new study

14 Sep

Diabetes and Caffeine

Caffeine, from coffee and tea, may lower the risk of death in women with diabetes, study finds

Doctors Eye the Danger From 'Nerf' Guns

Doctors Eye the Danger From 'Nerf' Guns

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nerf guns can be great fun for kids -- until someone damages an eye, doctors warn.

Nerf guns or "blasters" are hugely popular toys -- used by kids and adults alike -- that shoot a soft foam "dart" or "bullet."

But a new report from emergency department doctors at one British hospita...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 18, 2017
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Death Risk From Triathlons May Be Higher Than Thought

Death Risk From Triathlons May Be Higher Than Thought

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Could some triathlon participants be pushing themselves too hard?

New research suggests the odds that an athlete will die during these tests of endurance are higher than previously believed.

"We identified a total of 135 deaths and cardiac arrests in U.S. triathlons from the inceptio...

  • Alan Mozes
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  • September 18, 2017
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Minorities Exposed to Dirtier Air, U.S. Study Finds

Minorities Exposed to Dirtier Air, U.S. Study Finds

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nonwhite Americans are surrounded by more air pollution from traffic than whites are, a new study finds.

While exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) fell among all Americans between 2000 and 2010, there was only a slight narrowing in differences between levels of exposure to the pollutant between...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 18, 2017
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Do Nursing Home Workers Change Gloves Often Enough?

Do Nursing Home Workers Change Gloves Often Enough?

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nursing home workers often fail to change their gloves when they should, which increases the risk of patient infections, a new study finds.

"Glove use behavior is as important as hand washing when it comes to infection prevention," lead study author Deborah Patterson Burdsall said.

"...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 18, 2017
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Higher Cigarette Taxes May Mean Fewer Infant Deaths

Higher Cigarette Taxes May Mean Fewer Infant Deaths

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new European study finds that when the price of cigarettes rises, infant deaths decline.

The finding didn't surprise one U.S. expert in child health, because when fewer mothers can afford to smoke any longer -- or take up the habit -- their kids' health improves.

"The association b...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 18, 2017
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HIV and Smoking a Lethal Combo for the Lungs

HIV and Smoking a Lethal Combo for the Lungs

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- HIV patients who take their medication but also smoke are about 10 times more likely to die from lung cancer than from AIDS-related causes, a new study estimates.

Lifesaving antiretroviral drugs have improved life expectancy to the point that patients now have more to fear from tobacco than HI...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • September 18, 2017
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U.S. Seniors Getting Healthier, Especially When Wealthy and White

U.S. Seniors Getting Healthier, Especially When Wealthy and White

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- American seniors are getting healthier overall, but the well-educated, rich and white are seeing the greatest gains, a new study finds.

Researchers reviewed federal government data on more than 55,000 older adults. They found that between 2000 and 2014, there was a 14 percent increase in the ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 18, 2017
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Beat Back Mosquitos After Hurricane Irma

Beat Back Mosquitos After Hurricane Irma

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As if those who weathered Hurricanes Irma and Harvey don't have enough to worry about, one bug expert warns that the standing water left behind is the perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes.

Residents need to drain birdbaths, pots and anything else in their yards that can provide egg-laying si...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 18, 2017
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Tattoo Today, Regret Tomorrow: Tips to Parents From Pediatricians

Tattoo Today, Regret Tomorrow: Tips to Parents From Pediatricians

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- That tattoo and nose ring may look cool now, but what about tomorrow?

Teens should pause before getting inked -- especially with the name of their current sweetheart.

That's some of the advice in a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics, a leading group of doctors who car...

  • Amy Norton
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  • September 18, 2017
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Big Rise in Hospitalized Kids With Opioid Side Effects

Big Rise in Hospitalized Kids With Opioid Side Effects

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a large increase in the number of young hospital patients in the United States who suffer harmful side effects from opioid painkillers, a new study says.

The findings show an urgent need for safer pain medications for young patients, the researchers said.

The researche...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 18, 2017
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It's a Food Allergy! Where's the School Nurse?

It's a Food Allergy! Where's the School Nurse?

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many students who suffer a severe allergic reaction at school get potentially lifesaving epinephrine injections from unlicensed staff or other students, not a school nurse, a new study finds.

"The findings highlight the importance of having a supply of epinephrine available in schools, and peo...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 18, 2017
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Parents Say Schools Don't Help Kids With Mental Health, Chronic Disease

Parents Say Schools Don't Help Kids With Mental Health, Chronic Disease

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many parents don't believe schools are prepared to help students with mental health problems and serious physical health issues, a new survey finds.

While 77 percent of parents were certain that schools would be able to provide first aid for minor issues such as cuts, they were less confident ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 18, 2017
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Cutting the Fat From Your Favorite Brews

Cutting the Fat From Your Favorite Brews

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Whether it's to get your day going, a way to curb your appetite, or just a taste you love, you might insist on your daily coffee fix.

But depending on what you add to it, that cup of joe can easily skyrocket from zero calories into the hundreds. And that could be as much as a third of your dai...

  • Julie Davis
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  • September 18, 2017
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Even Teens Can Suffer Organ Damage From High Blood Pressure

Even Teens Can Suffer Organ Damage From High Blood Pressure

SUNDAY, Sept. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure can lead to organ damage -- and the risk isn't limited to adults, new research suggests.

Along with a growing number of obese children in the United States, high blood pressure is on the rise -- and with it the risk of organ failure in teens, the...

  • Nicole Moschella
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  • September 18, 2017
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Suicidal Thoughts More Common for Transgender Youth

Suicidal Thoughts More Common for Transgender Youth

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Transgender youth are more likely to have suicidal thoughts, a new study finds.

Researchers examined survey data from more than 900,000 high school students in California. They found that 35 percent of transgender youth said they'd had suicidal thoughts in the past year, compared with 19 perce...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 15, 2017
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Surgery Can Be Trigger for Teen Opioid Abuse

Surgery Can Be Trigger for Teen Opioid Abuse

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Teens and young adults who have surgery may be at increased risk for opioid painkiller abuse, a new study indicates.

Opioids such as oxycodone (OxyContin) and hydrocodone (Vicodin) are commonly prescribed for pain after surgery.

"And until recently, it was generally believed they we...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 15, 2017
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Selena Gomez's Kidney Transplant Puts Lupus Center Stage

Selena Gomez's Kidney Transplant Puts Lupus Center Stage

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When pop star Selena Gomez revealed Thursday that she had a kidney transplant, she put the autoimmune disease lupus in the spotlight.

Lupus turns the body's immune system against itself and attacks vital organs, including the kidneys, which is why it's so devastating. But little is known abou...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • September 15, 2017
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Golf Carts' Use Is Spreading, and So Is Danger to Kids

Golf Carts' Use Is Spreading, and So Is Danger to Kids

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Golf carts aren't just for golfers anymore, and their widening use means injuries for kids who want to give the vehicles a whirl, new research shows.

Researchers looked at more than 100 children ages 17 or younger treated at pediatric or adult trauma centers in Pennsylvania after being injured...

  • Alan Mozes
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  • September 15, 2017
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Joining Your Kid on That Playground Slide? Think Again

Joining Your Kid on That Playground Slide? Think Again

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It's a slippery slope to injury.

A new study finds that while young kids may feel safer going down a slide on a parent's lap, this common practice actually raises their risk for harm.

"Many parents and caregivers go down a slide with a young child on their lap without giving it a se...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • September 15, 2017
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Skin Patch Shrinks 'Love Handles' -- in Mice

Skin Patch Shrinks 'Love Handles' -- in Mice

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine using a medicated skin patch to burn off areas of unwanted fat, including those "love handles."

Scientists are doing just that -- in mice.

A skin patch designed to convert unhealthy white fat into energy-burning brown fat was effective in rodents, according to researchers a...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • September 15, 2017
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